Walking and cycling improvements: Kingsford to Centennial Park

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Construction on a new 2.8km two-way cycleway between Kingsford to Centennial Parklands is currently under construction.

The project, developed by Randwick City Council and being delivered by Transport for NSW, is part of a $240 million investment by the Australian and NSW Governments to fix congestion hotspots, expand the cycling network and help the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit the Transport for NSW website for more on the construction of the cycleway.

Have your say on replacement tree species

As part of construction of the cycleway, approximately 47 trees are required to be removed. Both Transport for NSW and Randwick Council have worked hard to design the cycleway to minimise tree loss. The trees being removed have been assessed as part of the Review of Environmental Factors and are mostly non-native trees and were found not to be ecologically sensitive.

To compensate for the loss of trees, more than 141 native replacement trees will be planted as part of the project.

You can get involved in the replacement tree planting program by:

  1. Taking our tree replacement survey to give feedback on your preferred tree species; and
  2. Using our interactive map to identify suitable locations for new trees to be planted.

Please note: While Council will take on board all community requests for specific species and locations, not all requests may be able to be delivered and will be dependent on the location chosen, conditions and neighbouring tree species.

Proposed tree replacement species

Brush box
Lophostemon confertus

A hardy, native tree with evergreen foliage and clusters of cream-white star shaped flowers in spring and summer. Grows to 10m in height and provides great shade.

Blueberry Ash
Elaeocarpus reticulata

A hardy evergreen native tree with a dense crown of foliage and an approximately conical form. It has masses of delicately fringed small pink flowers in spring that turn into blue berries which are attractive to seed eating birds. It requires little maintenance to thrive and grows to 7m in height.

Small Leaf Lillipilly
Syzigium leuhmannii

An evergreen native tree with a dense, rounded crown of weeping, glossy, dark green foliage. Produces showy sprays of white, fluffy flowers in spring, which are followed by edible red, pear-shaped fruit. Grows to 5m in height.

Tuckeroo
Cupaniopsis anacardioides

A small evergreen, native tree with attractive glossy green large leaves, smooth grey bark, and a spreading crown shape. It has green-yellow flowers in spring followed by decorative orange-yellow seed pods in summer. grows to 6m in height.

MAIN ROADS OR PARKS ONLY
Spotted Gum
Corymbia maculata

A medium to tall evergreen native tree with smooth cream to dark grey or bluish bark with a spotted or blotched appearance. The flowers are white, fragrant and carried in clusters of three to five. As this tree grows to 20m in height it is suitable only for parks and open spaces or main roads.

MAIN ROADS OR PARKS ONLY
Smooth-barked Apple
Angophora costata

An evergreen native tree with peeling salmon pink to pale grey bark. Small white flowers are borne in mass in spring, leading to small gum nuts that are not problematic for lawnmowers. As this tree grows to 18m in height it is suitable only for parks and open spaces or main roads.


consultation period: 3 August to 5pm, 31 August 2022.

Construction on a new 2.8km two-way cycleway between Kingsford to Centennial Parklands is currently under construction.

The project, developed by Randwick City Council and being delivered by Transport for NSW, is part of a $240 million investment by the Australian and NSW Governments to fix congestion hotspots, expand the cycling network and help the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit the Transport for NSW website for more on the construction of the cycleway.

Have your say on replacement tree species

As part of construction of the cycleway, approximately 47 trees are required to be removed. Both Transport for NSW and Randwick Council have worked hard to design the cycleway to minimise tree loss. The trees being removed have been assessed as part of the Review of Environmental Factors and are mostly non-native trees and were found not to be ecologically sensitive.

To compensate for the loss of trees, more than 141 native replacement trees will be planted as part of the project.

You can get involved in the replacement tree planting program by:

  1. Taking our tree replacement survey to give feedback on your preferred tree species; and
  2. Using our interactive map to identify suitable locations for new trees to be planted.

Please note: While Council will take on board all community requests for specific species and locations, not all requests may be able to be delivered and will be dependent on the location chosen, conditions and neighbouring tree species.

Proposed tree replacement species

Brush box
Lophostemon confertus

A hardy, native tree with evergreen foliage and clusters of cream-white star shaped flowers in spring and summer. Grows to 10m in height and provides great shade.

Blueberry Ash
Elaeocarpus reticulata

A hardy evergreen native tree with a dense crown of foliage and an approximately conical form. It has masses of delicately fringed small pink flowers in spring that turn into blue berries which are attractive to seed eating birds. It requires little maintenance to thrive and grows to 7m in height.

Small Leaf Lillipilly
Syzigium leuhmannii

An evergreen native tree with a dense, rounded crown of weeping, glossy, dark green foliage. Produces showy sprays of white, fluffy flowers in spring, which are followed by edible red, pear-shaped fruit. Grows to 5m in height.

Tuckeroo
Cupaniopsis anacardioides

A small evergreen, native tree with attractive glossy green large leaves, smooth grey bark, and a spreading crown shape. It has green-yellow flowers in spring followed by decorative orange-yellow seed pods in summer. grows to 6m in height.

MAIN ROADS OR PARKS ONLY
Spotted Gum
Corymbia maculata

A medium to tall evergreen native tree with smooth cream to dark grey or bluish bark with a spotted or blotched appearance. The flowers are white, fragrant and carried in clusters of three to five. As this tree grows to 20m in height it is suitable only for parks and open spaces or main roads.

MAIN ROADS OR PARKS ONLY
Smooth-barked Apple
Angophora costata

An evergreen native tree with peeling salmon pink to pale grey bark. Small white flowers are borne in mass in spring, leading to small gum nuts that are not problematic for lawnmowers. As this tree grows to 18m in height it is suitable only for parks and open spaces or main roads.


consultation period: 3 August to 5pm, 31 August 2022.

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Request a tree

20 days

As part of the tree replacement program, more than 141 native trees are planned to be planted along the cycleway route or in the general vicinity of the project. 

Use this map to suggest locations you feel are suitable to plant a tree and let us know your preferred species.

You must be registered with this site to drop a pin. 

Page last updated: 18 Aug 2022, 12:01 AM